Indy Author Fair Offers Opportunities for Writers, Readers

Book signing at Indy Author Fair was chance to  offer my books to new readers.

Book signing at Indy Author Fair was chance to offer my books to new readers.


Recently I was honored to be chosen to participate in the Indy Author Fair. It was held at the Central Library in downtown Indianapolis. The Indy Author Fair is presented by the Eugene & Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Award and The Indianapolis Public Library. The fair was free and included other free activities including a panel discussion of award-winning authors.

While I did not participate in the discussion as a panelist, I did enjoy the book signing session and meeting other authors from the state of Indiana who have published books.

James Alexander Thom is Hoosier author of historical novels.

James Alexander Thom is Hoosier author of historical novels.


One author I was especially privileged to meet was famed historian James Alexander Thom. I read his book Follow the River in the 1970s and loved it.

As luck would have it, I was seated near Mr Thom and took the opportunity to tell him of my admiration for his research in the historical novels he’s written about Native Americans. We chatted several minutes and it was a highlight of the day for me. I purchased his book, Red Heart, about the story of Frances Slocum, a white child kidnapped and raised by Miamis. She was eventually found living in Peru, Indiana, with the tribe and refused to leave them when her white family begged her to return with them to PA. Interesting!

Another highlight was meeting a ‘fan’ of mine of sorts.

Meeting readers is a fun part of author fairs.

Meeting readers is a fun part of author fairs.


Mandy Suhre attended my workshop in 2012 of the National Missionary Convention in Indianapolis on ‘Writing That Praises God’. She’s kept in touch with me during the past year and is pursuing her ambition of being a published writer by meeting authors at the fair. Although she didn’t know I would be at the fair, she did introduce herself to me. I was thrilled to see her and wish her God’s grace on her future as a writer.
Laurie Gray has authored books for children and teens.

Laurie Gray has authored books for children and teens.


Still another highlight was spending time with my friend Laurie Gray who is the author of books for children and teens—Summer Sanctuary and Maybe I Will. She has other books being released by Luminis in 2014.
Plan now to attend the next Indianapolis Author Fair. http://www.indianaauthorsaward.org/
What opportunities are you using to expand your knowledge of writing and book publishing? The year 2014 might just be your time to shine!

Cradle of Grace

The son of God was laid in a manger, a place where animals fed.

The son of God was laid in a manger, a place where animals fed.

“…and she gave birth to her firstborn, a son. She wrapped him in cloths and placed him in a manger.” Luke 2:7.

Many people today display a Nativity scene during the Christmas season. The tiny figures of Mary, Joseph, shepherds, and a sheep or two surround Baby Jesus, asleep in a manger. The scene looks calm and idyllic.
Unfortunately, our twentieth century minds have created a scene quite unlike what it was like when Jesus was born, especially concerning the manger. We see it as a sort of glorified first-century bassinet, comfortable, clean, and safe for a newborn baby.
In reality the manger of Jesus’ time was not like that at all. It may not have been wooden. Some Bible scholars believe Mary and Joseph sought refuge in one of the caves surrounding Bethlehem. Situated not far from Bethlehem’s lush grasslands, these caves were excellent shelters for livestock. Most of the caves were formed by erosion of the area’s soft limestone and herdsmen often carved out niches in the cave wall for feeding troughs. This primitive area was possibly where Mary placed Baby Jesus.

Jesus' manger may have been made of wood or carved into a cave wall.

Jesus’ manger may have been made of wood or carved into a cave wall.


It is strange the Bible even mentions a manger. Such an obscure object would not have been thought of with respect in those days. The manger would have been nothing but a filthy feeder. Today it would be as if Jesus were born and then placed in a trash can. The thought makes us shudder.
But Joseph, a man who loved God and his family, would have cleaned the manger as well as he could, filling it with any available new straw so it could serve as a soft, dry cradle for the child. This makeshift spot was the first place the Savior of the world, the Son of God, laid his precious head.
We might wonder why God would allow his newborn Son to be placed in such a despicable place. We can only surmise about God’s plans, but maybe there was a reason. Maybe God wanted us to know He specializes in taking the ordinary, dirty and forgotten and making it extraordinary.

Only God could transform a manger into an object of love, security, peace, and hope.
He is willing to do the same with our lives. When we place our dirty mangers into His hands – ugly things like anger, gossipy spirit, envious desires — He transforms them by the Holy Spirit into something holy and pleasing to God.
If you have a dirty manger in your life, this Christmas season ask God to transform it into something beautiful and worthy of respect and dignity for His glory. That is the best present you could ever give Him.

What type of ‘manger’ will you offer Jesus this year?

The End