Saying Good-bye to 2 Special Vets

It’s part of the nature of my project of interviewing some of our nation’s eldest military veterans so I should expect it. With many of them well into their 90s, I have to face the fact that they will all someday be deceased.

Still, it is hard to receive that kind of news.

Recently, I learned that two veterans from my latest book, They Did It for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans, had died.


Lorraine Hook Davis (1920-2018) was a kind, quiet lady whom I interviewed two years ago in her apartment.

As a college graduate, she automatically became an officer upon joining the Coast Guard. That made her an extraordinary veteran to me because she was

  1. a) female- really rare to find these days,
  2. b) Coast Guard—really hard to find in Indiana!
  3. c) college graduate—it’s amazing she had the funds and determination to attend and graduate from college during the late years of the Great Depression.

She didn’t consider her military service during World War II as any great achievement. My word for her – and every other female who volunteered to serve during that ‘Man’s War’– is plucky.

I don’t know if I would have had the courage to sign up, leave home to live across the country for several years and live as a soldier.

Formal Uniform 25072017

I was thrilled to visit with Lorraine at my book launch party in November 2017. Her appearance belies her age of 97! She signed dozens (maybe hundreds) of copies of books for people and looked happy while doing so.

She just reached her 98th birthday a few weeks ago, leaving a long legacy of military service to be proud of among her family.


Oren Huffer (1924-2018)

aHuffer Oren- HF

This was one of the quietest, sweetest men I’ve ever met. I thought he was reserved during our interview but as I got to know him I realized that was his way. He never hesitated to tell me about his work with gliders during World War II.

You don’t have to know anything about gliders to imagine how dangerous these things could be with no motor to guide them. Landings were especially hazardous. When I asked him about them, he admitted that they were but looked as though it didn’t faze him. He had never been injured which is quite a miracle, in my book.

After the war, he worked as an educator in the Fort Wayne area, which made him extra-special as I’m from a family of teachers.


He also attended the book launch in Nov 2017 which made me very happy. The book launch was designed for the veterans so they were seated around a large room. The public was invited to come and meet them and thank them for their service. If they wanted to purchase a book, the veterans could sign them.

Among the 17 veterans present was Oren, who appears relaxed in this photo. I think he enjoyed the day and I hope he had good memories of it for weeks to come.

Oren and Lorraine were both very special people and I’m honored to have known them. I don’t always hear about the deaths of the men/women I’ve interviewed. Thanks to those of you who notify me with updates.


Good news!

A few weeks ago Fort Wayne Community Schools (IN), purchased enough copies of my two World War II books to put one in each of their middle/high schools. As this is one of the largest school districts in the state, you can imagine my excitement.

I have worked in a middle school library so I know what kids like to read. I’ve also written 15 children’s books (here is my Amazon page listing).

My books could be understood by students in grades 6 and up. My goal is to promote patriotism among readers – what better age group to learn about patriotism than students!

If your group would like to order 10+ copies, please contact me for information about bulk rates.


As always, thanks to every veteran reading this for your service. This wife/mother of Air Force airmen appreciates your dedication to our country.




Vets Describe D-Day

D-Day. June 6, 1944.

Possibly only a handful of dates in our nation’s military history are more well- known other than Pearl Harbor (December 7, 1941).

D-Day was a top secret event that had been planned for months. Every branch was involved in storming the beaches of Normandy France to overcome Hitler’s forces.

Here are a few comments from veterans of various branches whom I’ve interviewed about their involvement with D-Day:

Despite months of training, nothing went according to plan.

As Leo Scheer’s boat neared the shore of Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, it hit two mines, igniting it. “We were told to strip our gear and abandon ship,” he said.

The weight of life vests, layers of clothing and combat boots dragged many soldiers into the frigid waters. “Drowned bodies floated in those waters for weeks,” said Scheer. “Many washed up against the sea wall with not a scratch on them.”

Those who made it to shore were ordered to the west end. Scheer was almost killed twice from gunfire. Finally he arrived, only to find the squadron doctor missing.

Wearing the Red Cross arm band and helmet, Leo worked on injured soldiers, removing medical supplies from bodies of dead soldiers to treat the wounded. “Bandages were packaged in waterproof tins which also contained morphine shots,” he said. “It was all we had.”

The first course of action was to stop the bleeding. “We tried to prevent shock and used morphine when necessary,” he added. Artillery fire continued non-stop for days. Soldiers were treated on the sand. “We eventually got a spot in front of a house and put the casualties there,” said Scheer.

A barrage of artillery file forced Scheer to administer medical attention while lying on the ground. “Even getting on your knees was risky,” he said.

“You slept fully clothed with your helmet on,” said Scheer. “Shells came in close. I buried myself under the sand and in the morning crawled out, glad to be alive.”

Note: The photo depicts the web belt Scheer used at D-Day, now a donated item on display at the National WWII Museum in New Orleans.


Wolfe Don-FW-Air Corps

After flying from the US to an Allied air base outside the town of Muching Green in England in spring 1944, Donald Wolfe had only two weeks of training before he flew his first combat mission, called a ‘sortie’. “During the next several weeks, I flew missions over France, Holland, Belgium, and Germany,” he said.

His 44th mission occurred on D-Day as he flew over Normandy lending support to the Allies.


Anderson James -Indy-Army

At Omaha Beach Andy Anderson carried penicillin, bandages, iodine and sulpha packets in his supply packet. As a medic on the battlefield he wore an arm band with a Red Cross, signifying his status. Although he didn’t carry a weapon, Anderson felt safe. “I depended on our American infantry to protect me,” he said.


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Alfred Edwards of Fort Wayne, IN, was operating a rhino barge on June 6, 1944. Such vessels carried tanks and troops as part of the first wave of troops to approach the shore of Omaha Beach in France. “We had no protection from enemy fire as we guided it in,” he said.

When boats and troops reached the shore and put ramps down, the site was grim. “Dead GIs lay everywhere on the beach,” said Edwards. “We dodged shooting from German soldiers while searching for mines embedded in the sand that could blow us up as we neared the shore.”

Despite incredible odds, Allied forces continued to arrive at the beach for weeks, slowly pushing German forces back into France. Code name of the secret invasion: Operation Overlord, though it was more commonly known as D-Day.


These are excerpts of stories in my book, WWII Legacies: Stories of Northeast IN Veterans (available for purchase on this site) and in my soon-to-be-released book, They Did It for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans.

It will be released in Summer 2017. Stay tuned for more details on how to obtain a copy!

Honor a veteran today by thanking him/ her for their service to our country.

B-29 Gunner Flew 33 Missions; Met FDR

Homer Bates 1943

Homer Bates flew B-29s during WWII

In 1942, after enlisting with the Army Air Corps and testing high for skills needed to work with aircraft, Homer Bates of Markle, IN, was assigned to the 20th Air Force 58th Bomber Wing. His assigned duties would be manning a gun turret on a B29. As B29s were still in production, gunners practiced on B17 simulators since they had similar controls. When it came time to practice shooting, the gunners experienced a problem.

“Several of us were told to shoot painted ammo simultaneously at a banner flying behind a tow plane,” he said. “It served as a moving target and we were judged on our shooting abilities. At first the judges could not tell whose shots went where. So we were given ammo painted different colors. The judges could then tell by colors of holes which gunners needed more practice.”

His first mission over Japan took place June 1944. “For more than a year it was a steady routine of dropping bombs and encountering enemy fighters and heavy accurate flak,” he said. His longest mission to Nagoya lasted 18 hours. During the war, Bates flew 33 missions over Japan in B29s.

In February 1944 Bates’ crew was ordered to fly a B29 Typhoon McGoon III to Washington D.C. No reason was given for the special trip. Upon landing at Bolling Field, the crew commander was met by General Hap Arnold and his staff. Each of the crew members was greeted and asked to explain the aircraft so he could brief the president. The following morning the crew was completing their pre-flight check of equipment when they saw a limousine pull up beside the plane, along with an official-looking motorcade. President Franklin D. Roosevelt had arrived!

He and members of his family began questioning the crew about the aircraft. Anna Roosevelt Boettiger and her two teenaged children, Eleanor and Curtis, went into the nose section and asked questions of the crew. “It was obvious she was well versed about the plane,” said Bates.

The president remained in the vehicle but appeared pleased with the aircraft. “That was perhaps the only time the President ever saw a B29,” said Bates. Considering that the B29 project cost $3 billion and the A-bomb $2 billion, the president’s approval was a relief to the crew. The president ended the session by shaking hands with each crew member.


Staff sergeant Bates was discharged November 2, 1945. For his bravery and contribution to the war effort he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and several other medals. In 1990 the Chinese Air Force recognized Bates’ efforts and sent him a certificate of appreciation.


Military life had gotten into Bates’ blood. He joined the Indiana Air National Guard from 1954-1961. He re-joined the Air Force, spent a year in France during the Berlin Wall Crisis, then re-joined the Air National Guard full time until 1982, retiring as a Master Sergeant.

I was privileged to include Homer’s story in my book, WWII Legacies: Stories of Northeast IN Veterans. Homer is my husband’s uncle and in recent years we became good friends. Sadly, Uncle Homer passed away in Nov. 2016. We often thanked him for his service. As my husband and son have both served in the Air Force, they always had lots to talk about!