Hundreds Attend Book Launch to tell WWII Vets Thanks

Many of you participated in our book launch party for They Did It for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans on Saturday, Nov 4, 2017, at the Allen County Public Library.

I think it’s safe to say, as the photo below shows, it was a smashing success! Several hundred people are estimated to have attended to meet/ greet some of our nation’s oldest veterans.

crowd

An amazing number of the 34 veterans from the book – 17 – were present. Two additional veterans were represented by family members, which meant much to me. Kurt Wallenstein whose father was Robert Wallenstein, better known in the Fort Wayne area, as WOWO Komet Hockey announcer Bob Chase wrote me these words: “Thank you for the beautiful book and celebrating the lives of all of those great men and women.”

Huffer

Someone who attended who was not related to the veterans wrote me: “Thank you for acting on the realization that veterans had a story that my/our hearts needed to hear!”

Zeissig

I’m so touched by the dedication the public showed by patiently standing in line, waiting for opportunities to have veterans sign their books and speak with them.

Conrad Gaylord

My goal was to have the veterans, all of whom are at least 90 years old, be glad they had made the effort to attend. As far as I could tell, they all left with smiles on their faces.

If you were able to attend, please share your thoughts/ comments/photos about the day.

Kjreusser@adamswells.com

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If you’ve read They Did It for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans, would you consider posting a review on Amazon at  http://amzn.to/2yRAbcq ?

My other book, WWII Legacies: Stories of Northeast IN Veterans, contains 28 stories similar to those in They Did It for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans. You can find it & post a review at Amazon (http://amzn.to/2hJdwaW).

The reviews will help more people learn about the great people who served in World War II.

As always, I appreciate your support!

I plan to write more books in 2018 so stay tuned!

 

 

Sam Hayward’s duties were to clean berths aboard the USS Yorktown

Another veteran from my book, They Did It for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans, who is planning to attend the book launch is Sam Hayward. This was a different type of interview for me as he was the first black veteran I had ever interviewed. I was thrilled that Sam allowed me to talk with him about his military service, but some of it was heartbreaking, mostly due to hearing about the racial discrimination in the military during the war.

Here’s an excerpt from his story:

During World War II, Sam Hayward from Charleston, SC, was assigned different duties from white seamen. “We colored people were taught to set tables and serve food to officers three times a day,” he said. “Those were our general duties aboard ship.”

Ever since he heard about the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 7, 1941, Hayward had wanted to enlist. Hayward was assigned to the aircraft carrier, USS Yorktown CV-10.

In addition to serving as mess attendants during meals for pilots stationed to the ship, Hayward and other black stewards cleaned the pilots’ rooms. Their own sleeping berths were separate from white sailors as were their galleys.

How did Hayward react to such restrictions? “Nothing bothered me because I was used to it,” he said. “It was the 1940s. We blacks were raised to know whites came first.”

**

Some of his story shocked me. Readers have relayed the same reaction. How do you feel about hearing Sam’s story?

Sam is excited about attending the book launch, which will honor him and the other 33 World War II veterans featured in the book. Copies of the book will be available for purchase of $20.00 and to be signed by Sam and the others. We’ll hope to see you there!

Purchase my book here.

A List of Names of Vets Featured in ‘They Did It for Honor’

Caption: Virgil Bixler served in the U.S. Army’s 80th Division, 905th Artillery during WWII. He fought in Battle of the Bulge and others.

**

My new book, They Did It for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans, contains 34 stories of men/women of every branch- Army, Navy, Army Air Corps, Marines, Merchant Marines, Coast Guard.

Here is a list of the 34 veterans featured in this book and their branch of service:

  1. James ‘Andy’ Anderson – Army
  2. Virgil Bixler – Army
  3. Charlie Conrad – Navy
  4. Gaylord Conrad – Army
  5. Lorraine Davis – Coast Guard
  6. Clairus Dew – Army Air Corps
  7. Al Edwards – Navy
  8. Charlotte Eisenhart – Women’s Army Corps (WAC)
  9. Frank Garrison – Army
  10. Dick Girocco – Navy
  11. Max Graf – Merchant Marine
  12. Sam Hayward – Navy
  13. Oren Huffer – Army Air Corps
  14. Bill Jones – Army Air Corps
  15. Bob Kiester – Army Air Corps
  16. Al Lefevra – Navy
  17. Polly Lipscomb – Army Nurse Corps
  18. Jim Meyer – Coast Guard
  19. Dale Pence – army
  20. Bob Pyle – Army
  21. Ed Robbins – Navy
  22. Walter Rumple – Army
  23. Bill Sawyer – Army
  24. Rosemary Schmidt – Navy
  25. Calvin Schultz – Army
  26. Bill Shull – Army Air Corps
  27. Bob Wallenstein (Bob Chase) – Navy
  28. Hugh Wallis – Army
  29. Bill Wellman – Marines
  30. Max Whiteleather – Army
  31. James Wiegman – Navy
  32. Don Wolfe – Army Air Corps
  33. John Wrestler – Navy
  34. Eileen Zeissig – Army Nurse Corps

**

Several of these veterans (around a dozen) have said they will be at our book launch party on Saturday, November 4, at downtown Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana. They will be there from 1-3pm. You’ll be able to meet them, thank them for their service and have them sign books on their respective pages!

Think what a priceless item that will be – autographs from some of our nation’s oldest veterans who served during the biggest military conflict the world has ever known!

They Did It for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans will be available for $20—cash or credit cards. No checks.

My first book, WWII Legacies: Stories of Northeast IN Veterans, will also be available for $15.00.

Bonus: We will sell the 2 books together for $30.00!

They would make great Veteran’s Day, birthday or Christmas gifts.

We’re expecting a good turnout so my advice would be to arrive early! Hope to see you there!

Remember to tell a veteran thanks for his/ her service!

 

 

The Bridge Worth its Weight in Gold

I had heard about the battle for Remagen Bridge from several World War II veterans during interviews, but it was entirely different being there in person.

Our tour group left the Belgium Ardennes area and continued east through the Eifel Mountains. We followed the advance of the US 1st Army through to the Remagen Bridge that once spanned the River Rhine.

Remagen Br (5)

Note: Our guide pronounced it ‘RAY-ma-gen’, rather than the way my veterans who served there pronounced it with accent on the second syllable. No matter.

Having listened to my veterans and watched the 1969 movie, The Bridge at Remagen, I knew a little about what had gone on there between the Allies and Germans.

In March 1945, the American forces had just ended a victorious, but ferocious fight in the Ardennes region that had raged since mid-December.

In December 1944 the Nazis had assertively pushed into the territory of the Ardennes Forest of Belgium. The intense conflict which occurred during one of the worst winters on record became known as the Battle of the Bulge.

Like most Allied soldiers, Max Whiteleather (below) fought at the Bulge while living in fox holes filled with snow. When clouds finally cleared around Christmas, help arrived in the form of the Army Air Corps which dropped much-needed supplies.

aWhiteleather old standing

As the Allies proceeded to advance into the heart of Germany, they were ordered to advance on Remagen. The bridge was crucial to gain a toehold into enemy territory. It had to be taken intact.

German armed forces tried unsuccessfully to defend the town and the nearby bridge across the Rhine.

Aware that the Rhine River posed the last major geographic obstacle to Allied troops, Hitler had ordered that the bridge over the river be destroyed rather than lost to the Allies.

Remagen Br (9)

Thankfully, members of the 9th US Armored Division disengaged explosives set to destroy the bridge and the plans were foiled. Allied troops reached the bridge and captured it intact on March 7, 1945, enabling 8,000 Allied troops to cross it.

George Buhler (below), a veteran whose story is recorded in my first book, WWII Legacies: Stories of Northeast IN Veterans, fought at Remagen. He recalled how the fighting was fierce. “The Germans shot 18-inch shells at us from railroad cars,” he said.

Buhler MP uni

Max Whiteleather had fought at D-Day on the beach of Normandy in June 1944. When his unit — 820th Engineer Aviation Battalion, Co A – was sent to Remagen, they were ordered to build an additional bridge– pontoon — across the Rhine following the Allies’ conquest.

As dozens of Allied vehicles lined up, waiting to cross, Max Whiteleather’s outfit set to work. The additional crossing helped the Allies gain the advantage needed to overcome the German Army.

Unfortunately, although the Army Corps of Engineers worked to reinforce the original bridge, which had been damaged during the conflict, on March 17 the bridge collapsed, killing 28 American soldiers.

Today, not much is left of the bridge, except its original basalt foundations and a museum about the bridge. Basalt is black stone native to Germany.

The quote in the title is by General Dwight D. Eisenhower upon learning that the Remagen Bridge had been taken intact.

For a relatively small bridge — you can see the distance in the photo — it’s amazing to think how much fighting occurred there. But as we learned on our tour of European World War II battlefields, bridges were a common place of conflict.

aThey_Did_It_for_Hono_Cover_for_Kindle

Max’s story is included in my second book, They Did It for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans. It contains 34 stories of men/women of every branch- Army, Navy, Army Air Corps, Marines, Merchant Marines, Coast Guard.

I’m excited to say it will be available in August 2017! Stay tuned here for more information!

Thank a veteran today for his/her service!

 

 

 

 

 

Bucket List: Take WWII Tour of Europe– Done!

My husband and I just returned from a 2-week World War II tour of Belgium, Luxembourg, France, Germany! The photo of my husband and me is on the patio of the ‘Eagle’s Nest’, Hitler’s retreat center, above the village of Berchtesgaden, Germany.

Mardasson_Memorial_Bastogne 6-17

We went with a group of 29 Americans and 3 Australians and one Chinese woman as part of World War II Tours of Europe. This photo is at the Mardasson Memorial at Bastogne, Belgium.

Talk about a whirlwind trip! Our guide, Dennis Ross, was experienced and so organized which made the trip enjoyable. We covered 2,000 km and five countries via a luxurious motor coach with a great driver named Gundolph.

It was exhausting, but so informational and fascinating. My husband has been interested in World War II for decades. I’ve only become interested since I started interviewing veterans in 2012. Put us together and we can usually spout some piece of knowledge about events in Europe and even the Pacific.

BUT…

This trip showed us how much we didn’t know. We soaked it all in, despite minds/bodies that were recovering from a six-hour time difference and 12-hour days on the road.

La Fiere bridge (8)

This photo was taken on June 6, 2017, at La Fiere Bridge in Normandy (France) region as a tribute from French people to the efforts of American troops 70+ years ago. These and other memorials showed us how much the European Allied countries continue to demonstrate their appreciation for our efforts on their behalf during their occupation by Nazis.

Compeigne For (2)

Photo: Museum at Compiegne Forest (France) where armistice was signed 1918, ending WWI with Germany’s defeat.

We visited the usual tourist sites like museums and had guided tours of Paris, Dachau, Nuremberg, Luxembourg, all of which was just up our alley (I was usually near the front to be sure to hear every word!)

Bastogne foxhole (4)

We stood in an actual foxhole in a woods in Bastogne where troops would have sought shelter from freezing weather and enemy troops.

We stood in the war room of Bastogne where in December 1944 General Anthony McAuliffe declared “Nuts!” to the Nazis’ demands that he surrender the 101st Airborne and its attached troops. Gen. McAuliffe and his troops held off the siege until reinforcements arrived from Allied troops.

Many of these and other examples of courage and determination during that mighty war that raged from 1939 when Hitler invaded Poland until 1945 when Axis forces surrendered were new to me. It was a pleasure to learn more about them in person!

 

Pegasus (18)

One of my favorite events was thanking British World War II veterans for their service. This photo was shot during an event honoring these vets on June 5 at Pegasus Bridge. I’ll save details for a later post.

It was great to get home and realize yet again what a great country we have – not perfect but pretty close in terms of helping oppressed countries in so many ways for decades.

I’ll be sharing more information about the trip here in future posts with photos (I shot 800+ and my husband took 350+).

I plan to give PowerPoint presentations on what we saw and learned, implementing quotes from veterans I’ve interviewed where appropriate. Many stories about these sites can be found in my book, WWII Legacies: Stories of Northeast IN Veterans.

If you know of a group that would be interested in having me speak on this topic, please contact me via this site’s Contact form.

And if you’ve not already done so, please subscribe to this blog to continue to receive my posts that cover WWII and other stories about American military vets.

Remember to thank a veteran today for his/her service. They deserve our appreciation!

“Fear Has an Odor”

One of the strongest quotes I was ever given during an interview was by a World War II veteran was by Simeon Hain, Naval Aviator in the Pacific.

“Fear has an odor,” he said. “It permeates your clothes and stinks. After getting back from a mission, I couldn’t wait to take a shower.”

In honor of Mr. Hain’s military service and birthday, I’m presenting part of his story from my book, World War II Legacies: Stories of Northeast Indiana Veterans:

For eight months between 1944 and 1945 Hain flew 40 missions in a B-24, dropping bombs on selected locations in the Pacific. “On the day of a mission someone would wake me for patrol at 2 a.m. with a flashlight in my eyes,” he said. “He pushed a clipboard under my nose telling me to sign that I had received my orders. Then I’d be given a briefcase filled with codes for the day, maps, charts, and other items pertinent for navigation.”

Hain didn’t have a college degree, which was required at the time for aviators. In fact, he had not even ridden in a plane or driven a car. Still, he was intrigued at the thought of flying.

After enlisting in 1942, Hain made it through basic training and was admitted to the Civilian Pilots Training program. At Ball State University Teacher’s College in Muncie, IN, he attended flight school in the morning, then had flight time in the afternoon.

Training in a Piper two-seater Cub was a challenge for Hain who battled motion sickness. “I didn’t want to wash out of the program so I bought Mother Sill’s Seasick Pills,” he said. He studied math and physics to pass the academic sections of the training, then spent three months in a PBY airplane (patrol bomber aircraft) before entering flight training in Corpus Christi, Texas. He received his wings on September 25, 1943.

Believing the Germans were planning to attack the United States mainland, the Navy assigned Hain the task of patrolling the St. John’s area near Jacksonville, Florida, for submarines.

Later, he was transferred to Norfolk, Virginia, for B-24 training. The B-24 was equipped not only with bombs but also with machine guns.

By early 1944, Hain was flying combat missions in the Pacific Theater. “If we encountered enemy fire, I’d fly the plane at 200 knots (230 miles per hour), and the gunner would man the machine gun so it blazed,” he said.

Hain’s crew had a secret way of detecting the location of the enemy. “During a flight, we could hear Japanese music in our radios,” he said. “When the music went off, we knew they had us on their radar.”

One consolation of being pursued was the multitude of Chinese fishing junks in the ocean. “We knew if we crashed into the ocean, they would help us,” he said.

Later that summer, Hain flew over Port Lyautey in Morocco and the Bay of Biscay in Spain. “Our mission was to watch on radar for enemy subs and eliminate them if possible,” he said. He also flew for the Battle of the Philippines in October 1944 and across Saipan and Tinian.

Hain headshot

In December 1944 Hain flew over the Bonin Islands, 500 miles southeast of Japan. He bombed Iwo Jima during the terrible battle there in February 1945.

When Hain was discharged on November 1, 1945, he held the rank of Lieutenant Junior Grade. He was presented with several medals and two Distinguished Flying crosses.

**

This is one of 28 stories in my book, World War II Legacies: Stories of Northeast Indiana Veterans. It contains stories from men/women who served in our nation’s military forces during 1941-1945. You can purchase it here at this site at a discount price of $15.00. It is also available on Amazon.

The stories are designed to enhance each reader’s appreciation of what our ancestors did for us and people around the world during that terrible time of war.

Please remember to thank a veteran today!

Army Soldier Built Radar Unit in the Line of Fire

I read today about the death of another veteran from my book, World War II Legacies: Stories of Northeast Indiana Veterans. Arnold Keuneke served with the US Army in Africa and Europe. He was the first veteran I interviewed who had served in Africa and with radar.

Here are excerpts from his story in my book:

“In February 1942 Keuneke was drafted into the U.S. Army. After completing basic training at Camp Crowder in Joplin, Missouri, Keuneke was sent to Midland Radio School in Kansas City, Missouri and radar school at Camp Murphy in West Palm Beach, Florida, and Drew Field in Tampa.

In January 1943, he and other American troops left on a boat from New York City for the African country of Ouran.

Tech Sergeant Keuneke was attached to the 12th Air Force in the Signal Corps. “We were in charge of maintaining a 588- radar unit,” he said. Radar systems used 300-foot steel masts to emit radio signals. The radar helped Allied pilots receive signals to alert them about enemy aircraft in the area. Located on a hill over the Mediterranean Sea in the South Tibesa desert, the unit operated solely under Keuneke’s expertise.

Part of his tasks required climbing the unit for repairs and working around wiring for bombs. “I had no fear of heights,” he said. “We were careful.”

Keuneke was often in the line of fire on the front line but miraculously always escaped injury. “Those bullets didn’t have my name on them,” he said.

Malaria was a constant threat for the troops in Africa. When Keuneke and his assistant were advised to swallow pills to prevent the dreaded illness, they did so but within hours, Keuneke felt sick. He quit taking the medicine and felt better, never contracting the dreaded disease. Unfortunately, his assistant developed malaria. As there was no hospital around Constantine where they were stationed, the assistant had to endure the illness on his own. Though he survived, he died of malarial symptoms five years after the war.

keuneke-new

From Africa, Keuneke was sent to Pisa and Corsica in Italy. While there, he befriended an Italian family. When he offered candy to their two little boys, the parents begged Keuneke to adopt the boys. “They were so poor and hungry and they thought I could provide a better home for their sons in America,” he said. Keuneke had to refuse the offer but was moved by their plight.

When the war was over, Keuneke, who had served his country for three years, returned to Indiana. He farmed and raised a family while working at Dana Corporation in Fort Wayne as an electrician.”

**

Arnold Keuneke was proud of his work while serving as a soldier. Rest in peace Mr. Keuneke and thanks for your service.

I’m proud of all of our vets. Thank a veteran today!

This is 1 of 28 stories in my book which is available for purchase at this site on the home page.